No Easter Pets, Please

March 30th, 2018

Have you seen those blue or pink baby chicks that appear in some farm or pet stores around this time of year? Well, if you haven’t, pretty please don’t go in search of them.

They make terrible gifts, even if they aren’t dyed pink. The same goes for ducklings or rabbits bought on the spur of the moment.

Many of these Easter gifts end up homeless, or let loose for predators. According to the CDC,  Easter chicks aren’t good for kids as they may carry Salmonella, which could be dangerous to children who don’t wash their hands properly after touching the chickens.

farm-adoption

To help prevent the suffering of discarded Easter pets and overcrowding at local shelters, the nonprofit Farm Sanctuary encourages parents to help promote a new compassionate tradition by sponsoring a rescued farm animal in need rather than buying an animal.

Many of the animal residents at Farm Sanctuary’s shelters were rescued after being given as presents for Easter, and they now depend on adoptive “parents” for their care.

If you believe the best Easter treats are chocolate, not live pets, share this blog post with others. Please have a great Easter and flower-filled spring!

This post was updated from an earlier version published on this blog in 2010. 

Ducklings and Chicks at Easter

March 23rd, 2010

Have you seen those blue or pink baby chicks that appear in some farm or pet stores around this time of year? Well, if you haven’t, pretty please don’t go in search of them.

They make terrible gifts, even if they aren’t dyed pink. The same goes for ducklings or rabbits bought on the spur of the moment. Many of these Easter gifts end up homeless. Plus, the CDC says that Easter chicks aren’t good for kids as they may carry Salmonella, which could be dangerous to children who don’t wash their hands properly after touching the chickens.

farm-adoption

To help prevent the suffering of discarded Easter pets and overcrowding at local shelters, Farm Sanctuary encourages parents to help promote a new compassionate tradition by sponsoring a rescued farm animal in need rather than buying a baby animal from a store. Many of the animal residents at Farm Sanctuary’s shelters were rescued after being given as presents for Easter, and they now depend on adoptive “parents” for their care. Continue reading »